Moringa Latte – A great way to start your Day!

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[Recipe] An easy to create morning drink to warm your soul while it provides seven times the amount of vitamin C as oranges, and twice as much protein as yogurt.  We learned a lot about the moringa health benefits in our previous article, now let’s create a healthy latte and check out a few more interesting facts about how to use this impressive herbal supplement.  Original articles are linked below.

Moringa is an excellent source of protein, vitamin A, potassium, calcium and vitamin C. Just how strong is moringa? According to Kuli Kuli, an organization that harvests moringa plants in Africa and makes them accessible to customers in the the U.S. and other western nations, gram for gram, moringa contains:

  • two times the amount of protein of yogurt
  • four times the amount of vitamin A as carrots
  • three times the amount of potassium as bananas
  • four times the amount of calcium as cows’ milk
  • seven times the amount of vitamin C as oranges

How to Use Moringa – As you can probably tell by now, moringa can be used in many different ways in order to utilize all the available moringa benefits. Because of the long transport time needed to ship moringa from parts of Africa or Asia where it’s grown, in the U.S. it’s usually sold in powder or capsule form, which prolongs its shelf life.  An interesting characteristic of moringa? It’s said to taste like a mix between horseradish and asparagus. (14) It might not have the most appealing flavor, but it’s a supplement with one of the the richest supplies of vital nutrients in the world, which makes the off-putting taste worth it.

There’s no recommended or required dosage of moringa at this time since it’s only an herbal supplement and not an essential nutrient. That being said, there’s some evidence that the optimum dose for humans has been calculated to be 29 milligrams per kilogram of body weight.

It’s recommended that you start by taking half a teaspoon of dried moringa orally per day for three to five days, increasing your intake slowly over two weeks as you get accumulated to its effects. Most people choose to take moringa every several days but not every single day for long duration of time, since it can cause laxative effects and an upset stomach when overused.

Here are the most common ways to use moringa to get the best moringa benefits possible:

  1. Dried moringa leaves or powder: It takes roughly seven pounds of moringa leaves to make one pound of dried powder. The leaves are considered the most potent parts of the plant, containing the most antioxidants and available macronutrients. In regard to the concentration of phenolic compounds, amino acids and volatile oils, the stem and root portions of the plant appear to have the least bioactive nutrients compared to the leaves. Look for moringa dried leaves in capsule, powder or tea form, and take them with a meal, rather than on an empty stomach.
  2. Moringa tea: This type of moringa is made from dried leaves steeped in hot water, just like many other beneficial herbal teas. The most nutrient-dense types are organic and dried slowly under low temperatures, which helps preserve delicate compounds. Avoid boiling the leaves to help retain the nutrients best, and don’t cook with moringa if possible.
  3. Moringa seeds: Moringa pods and flowers appear to have a high phenolic content along with proteins and fatty acids. These are the parts of the plant used to purify water and add protein to low-nutrient diets. Look for them added to creams, capsules and powders. The immature green pods of the plant are often called “drumsticks” and are prepared similarly to green beans. The seeds inside the pods are removed and roasted or dried just like nuts to preserve their freshness.
  4. Moringa oil: The oil from moringa seeds is sometimes called Ben oil. Look for it in natural creams or lotions. Keep the oil in a cool, dark place away from high temperatures or the sun.

Potential Moringa Side Effects & Concerns – Because it’s completely natural and free from chemical additives (when you buy a pure, high-quality brand), moringa taken by mouth or used on the skin seems to be very well-tolerated and unlikely to cause side effects. Leaves, fruit, oil and seeds from the moringa tree have been consumed safely for thousands of years, but today there are various forms of moringa supplements or extracts sold, so it’s important to buy the purest kind you can find. During pregnancy or when breast-feeding, it’s best to avoid moringa extract, root or high doses of supplements since not enough research has been done to show it’s definitely safe.

Let’s check in with Mercola.com for an easy and very healthy Moringa Latte you can whip up in a short time.

Calming and Supercharged Moringa Latte Recipe

Ingredients

1 1/2 cups full-fat coconut milk

1 teaspoon Moringa powder

1 teaspoon raw honey

Procedure

Combine Moringa powder and honey in the bottom of a mug.

Using a milk frother or a small saucepan, steam coconut milk until bubbles form. Pour into mug and stir gently to combine.

Enjoy!

Feature Image Source: Freegreatpictures

barbara

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